Nutrition & Trends
Nutrition & Trends

Dietary fiber offers health benefits that are appealing to consumers.

More and more members of society are aware of the importance of a healthy lifestyle. The understanding of what a healthy diet is and the objectives of consumers are diverse. Thus, the resulting nutritional and food trends are as well. There are various physiological benefits of dietary fibers, which makes it the ideal nutrient with regard to nutritional needs.

Dietary fiber has been shown to improve blood sugar metabolism, promote digestion and gut health, and help to prevent colon cancer, to name just a few of the benefits. However, the basic requirement is that food containing health-promoting nutrients, is better accepted by consumers. 

Dietary fiber proves to be the ideal solution, since it is naturally present in plant-based foods, but can also be enriched in a huge variety of processed food categories. The aim is to provide consumers with the appropriate range of food products to enable them to follow a healthy diet with sufficient dietary fiber content, regardless of their taste preferences.

Nutrition Facts

Blood Glucose Metabolism & Diabetes

Insoluble Dietary Fiber Improves Insulin Sensitivity
Insoluble Dietary Fiber Improves Insulin Sensitivity

Insoluble Dietary Fiber Improves Insulin Sensitivity

Cutting out sugar is a strategy for preventing or managing diabetes that many consumers follow. Even more effective and longer lasting is sufficient dietary fiber consumption. 

Dietary fiber impedes nutrient absorption in the human small intestine, thereby slowing the rise in blood glucose. Observational studies also show that it affects glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, which has a huge impact on downstream metabolic processes. 

The latter consistently applies for insoluble dietary fiber e.g., from cereals and whole grains, but not for soluble dietary fiber.

Digestive Health

Healthy Digestion is the Basis for intestinal Health
Healthy Digestion is the Basis for intestinal Health

Healthy Digestion is the Basis for intestinal Health and Downstream Metabolic Processes

Intestinal health has been a taboo subject for years. The increasing number of people suffering from digestive problems and the recognition of how important intestinal health is for overall wellbeing finally turned it into an important health trend. 

Understanding the abdomen as a “second brain” that is connected via the intestinal microbiota to different organs and metabolic processes increases consumer motivation to support it by having a healthy diet. Along with this, the interest in dietary fiber is increasing. Dietary fiber provides a healthy digestion by affecting fecal bulk and transit time and serves the intestinal microbiota as an energy substrate. 

In order to ensure dietary fiber availability along the entire intestine, the consumption of a mixture of rapidly and slowly fermentable dietary fibers is recommended. The proportion of insoluble dietary fiber also improves tolerability so that side effects like flatulence can be prevented.

Weight Management

Dietary Fiber Affects Weight Regulation
Dietary Fiber Affects Weight Regulation

Dietary Fiber Affects Weight Regulation in a Number of Ways and Helps to Prevent Obesityrelated Complications

With such an extensive range of foods, delicious and available everywhere, keeping one’s diet balanced is not easy. Even though awareness of the relevance of healthy eating is increasing, taste preferences have been shaped over decades and cannot easily be changed. 

Low calorie alternatives based on dietary fiber can therefore help consumers with limiting the intake of energy dense food and drink products high in fat and sugar. Dietary fiber is not only the nutrient with the lowest energy density, but also highly satiating. Paired, these two aspects provide excellent support for weight control. In its role as a prebiotic, fiber alters the intestinal microbiota, which has been shown to impact weight regulation. Focusing on intestinal health and low-calorie food alternatives is therefore promising in the fight against obesity. 

In addition, overweight people are at high risk of metabolic complications, which is why adequate fiber intake is particularly important in this population group for health prevention.

Cardiovascular Diseases

Cardiovascular Diseases
Cardiovascular Diseases

The Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases can be Reduced by Eating Foods Rich in Fiber and Unsaturated Fatty Acids

Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the most common consequence of diet-related risks around the world. Obesity in particular contributes to the fact that it is no longer just people above 60 who are affected, making it a key public health concern. 

However, the development and manifestation of metabolic diseases, especially if they occur as a result of being overweight, can be counteracted preventively by sufficient physical activity and more balanced, high fiber diets. High salt intake is linked with an increase in blood pressure. A high intake of saturated and trans fats is linked with unfavorable blood lipid levels. Both increase the risk of CVDs. 

Fiber and unsaturated fatty acids, on the other hand, have been shown to be beneficial for heart health. In addition to directly affecting parameters of heart health, dietary fiber represents an ingredient for the development of food products with heart-friendly nutritional profiles.

Cancer

Dietary Fiber Contributes to a Strong Intestinal Barrier
Dietary Fiber Contributes to a Strong Intestinal Barrier

Dietary Fiber Contributes to a Strong Intestinal Barrier that Protects Against Toxins and Tumorp Erromoting Metabolites

Colon cancer is one of the most common types of cancer, although preventive measures are very likely to prevent almost half of all cases. An important component of anti-carcinogenic mechanisms is a healthy and regular digestion. 

This is characterized by a short transit time and a high stool weight that not simply determines the frequency of emptying your bowels. Fiber is known to be beneficial for digestion. At the same time, it helps maintain a healthy intestinal microbiota and an intact gut barrier. Both protect against the formation of tumor-promoting metabolites. 

The most important thing for the intestines is sufficient fiber as an energy source to keep itself and the intestinal microbiota healthy and functional.

Immunity

A Balanced Intestinal Microbiota is Key in the Immune System
A Balanced Intestinal Microbiota is Key in the Immune System

A Balanced Intestinal Microbiota is Key in the Immune System

The intestine is the most important place when it comes to training the immune system. It contains numerous immune cells and also represents an important barrier for protection against inflammatory diseases such as Crohn's disease. 

Dietary fiber has an immunomodulating effect in the intestine, either directly, by strengthening the intestinal barrier through contact with the dietary fiber or indirectly by nourishing the intestinal microbiota. Maintaining a balanced gut microbiota requires the continuous availability of sufficiently complex carbohydrates as energy source. Gut microbiota dysbiosis might lead to inadequate energy supply for epithelial cells or even attack the inner mucus layer of the gut. The importance of a strong immune system is particularly evident in pandemic times. 

However, low-grade inflammatory processes also play a role in chronic diseases such as diabetes, which could be prevented by an intact intestinal barrier.

Nutrition Facts

Blood Glucose Metabolism & Diabetes
Digestive Health
Weight Management
Cardiovascular Diseases
Cancer
Immunity
Insoluble Dietary Fiber Improves Insulin Sensitivity
Insoluble Dietary Fiber Improves Insulin Sensitivity

Insoluble Dietary Fiber Improves Insulin Sensitivity

Cutting out sugar is a strategy for preventing or managing diabetes that many consumers follow. Even more effective and longer lasting is sufficient dietary fiber consumption. 

Dietary fiber impedes nutrient absorption in the human small intestine, thereby slowing the rise in blood glucose. Observational studies also show that it affects glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, which has a huge impact on downstream metabolic processes. 

The latter consistently applies for insoluble dietary fiber e.g., from cereals and whole grains, but not for soluble dietary fiber.

Healthy Digestion is the Basis for intestinal Health
Healthy Digestion is the Basis for intestinal Health

Healthy Digestion is the Basis for intestinal Health and Downstream Metabolic Processes

Intestinal health has been a taboo subject for years. The increasing number of people suffering from digestive problems and the recognition of how important intestinal health is for overall wellbeing finally turned it into an important health trend. 

Understanding the abdomen as a “second brain” that is connected via the intestinal microbiota to different organs and metabolic processes increases consumer motivation to support it by having a healthy diet. Along with this, the interest in dietary fiber is increasing. Dietary fiber provides a healthy digestion by affecting fecal bulk and transit time and serves the intestinal microbiota as an energy substrate. 

In order to ensure dietary fiber availability along the entire intestine, the consumption of a mixture of rapidly and slowly fermentable dietary fibers is recommended. The proportion of insoluble dietary fiber also improves tolerability so that side effects like flatulence can be prevented.

Dietary Fiber Affects Weight Regulation
Dietary Fiber Affects Weight Regulation

Dietary Fiber Affects Weight Regulation in a Number of Ways and Helps to Prevent Obesityrelated Complications

With such an extensive range of foods, delicious and available everywhere, keeping one’s diet balanced is not easy. Even though awareness of the relevance of healthy eating is increasing, taste preferences have been shaped over decades and cannot easily be changed. 

Low calorie alternatives based on dietary fiber can therefore help consumers with limiting the intake of energy dense food and drink products high in fat and sugar. Dietary fiber is not only the nutrient with the lowest energy density, but also highly satiating. Paired, these two aspects provide excellent support for weight control. In its role as a prebiotic, fiber alters the intestinal microbiota, which has been shown to impact weight regulation. Focusing on intestinal health and low-calorie food alternatives is therefore promising in the fight against obesity. 

In addition, overweight people are at high risk of metabolic complications, which is why adequate fiber intake is particularly important in this population group for health prevention.

Cardiovascular Diseases
Cardiovascular Diseases

The Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases can be Reduced by Eating Foods Rich in Fiber and Unsaturated Fatty Acids

Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the most common consequence of diet-related risks around the world. Obesity in particular contributes to the fact that it is no longer just people above 60 who are affected, making it a key public health concern. 

However, the development and manifestation of metabolic diseases, especially if they occur as a result of being overweight, can be counteracted preventively by sufficient physical activity and more balanced, high fiber diets. High salt intake is linked with an increase in blood pressure. A high intake of saturated and trans fats is linked with unfavorable blood lipid levels. Both increase the risk of CVDs. 

Fiber and unsaturated fatty acids, on the other hand, have been shown to be beneficial for heart health. In addition to directly affecting parameters of heart health, dietary fiber represents an ingredient for the development of food products with heart-friendly nutritional profiles.

Dietary Fiber Contributes to a Strong Intestinal Barrier
Dietary Fiber Contributes to a Strong Intestinal Barrier

Dietary Fiber Contributes to a Strong Intestinal Barrier that Protects Against Toxins and Tumorp Erromoting Metabolites

Colon cancer is one of the most common types of cancer, although preventive measures are very likely to prevent almost half of all cases. An important component of anti-carcinogenic mechanisms is a healthy and regular digestion. 

This is characterized by a short transit time and a high stool weight that not simply determines the frequency of emptying your bowels. Fiber is known to be beneficial for digestion. At the same time, it helps maintain a healthy intestinal microbiota and an intact gut barrier. Both protect against the formation of tumor-promoting metabolites. 

The most important thing for the intestines is sufficient fiber as an energy source to keep itself and the intestinal microbiota healthy and functional.

A Balanced Intestinal Microbiota is Key in the Immune System
A Balanced Intestinal Microbiota is Key in the Immune System

A Balanced Intestinal Microbiota is Key in the Immune System

The intestine is the most important place when it comes to training the immune system. It contains numerous immune cells and also represents an important barrier for protection against inflammatory diseases such as Crohn's disease. 

Dietary fiber has an immunomodulating effect in the intestine, either directly, by strengthening the intestinal barrier through contact with the dietary fiber or indirectly by nourishing the intestinal microbiota. Maintaining a balanced gut microbiota requires the continuous availability of sufficiently complex carbohydrates as energy source. Gut microbiota dysbiosis might lead to inadequate energy supply for epithelial cells or even attack the inner mucus layer of the gut. The importance of a strong immune system is particularly evident in pandemic times. 

However, low-grade inflammatory processes also play a role in chronic diseases such as diabetes, which could be prevented by an intact intestinal barrier.

Long-Standing Application Experience
Long-Standing Application Experience

Long-Standing Application Experience

More than 140 years of experience and a team of scientists and experts.

Up to Date with Every Fiber.

Follow us and you will always be up-to-date.

Privacy Policy

We Value Your Privacy

This website uses external tools and components to provide you the best experience on our website. You will find more detailed information in our privacy policy..

Privacy Policy